Orleans

Tony Hacking Memorial Bigfoot Birding

Birders gathered together for a group photo near the Camp Creek confluence with the Klamath River, Saturday, May 6, 2017./Photo courtesy Teresa Hacking. The Tony Hacking Memorial Bigfoot Birding Day accomplishes this in the Orleans community. Hacking led local birding events as the wildlife biologist on the Orleans Ranger District for the Six Rivers National Forest. Read More →

Everyone’s A Painter

Rick Tolley, a painter from the coast, helped organize a painters’ day Saturday with a team from the Karuk Tribe’s Pikyav Field Institute. The field had been mowed in advance but the mower had left big clusters of California poppies./Photo by Malcolm Terence, Two Rivers Tribune Contributor.  Forget the calendar. The first day of spring in Orleans was last Saturday, and dozens of locals of all ages showed up to observe it at a painter’s picnic. A handful of established painters from the coast also joined in. A crew of Karuk Tribe organizers set up the “Drawing Connections” event at the site that once held the Orleans Hotel. Read More →

Sworn to Serve

Karl NortonPromotions: Jason Benge – Compliance Officer, Andre Hale – Animal Control Facilities, Manager, Mark Peterson – Investigator, Jennifer Turner – Investigator, Natalie McCall – Senior Dispatcher, Chelsey Camilli – Correctional Corporal, Samantha Sintic – Correctional Corporal. Read More →

Karuk Storytellers Bypass Bookshelf

Ben Saxon, back to camera, polls students for their reactions after a lesson in oral tradition and storytelling at Junction School in Orleans./Photo by Malcolm Terence, Two Rivers Tribune Contributor.For generations children were taken from Native families in the U.S. and sent to Indian boarding schools where they were instructed in the English language white culture at the expense of their own language and culture. The Karuk Tribe is using a handful of federal grants to move in the other direction with the present generation of young people. The new program was put into action when a group of story tellers came to river schools. Besides the stories, the group shared xuun sára, acorn bread or crackers, and champínishich, yerba buena tea. Jesse Goodwin, one of the students, nodded appreciatively at the snacks and said he’d never had either before. His classmates agreed. Read More →

Hundreds Attend Memorial for Basket Weaver and Organizer in Orleans

Nearly 50 marchers left Orleans School headed for the bridge across the Klamath River. By the time they got there, their numbers had nearly doubled. Add that to the definition of River Time./Photo by Konrad Fisher, Klamath Riverkeeper. People gathered in large numbers in Orleans over the last week at three events. Each of them—a story-telling dinner with Standing Rock veterans, the memorial for a well-known Karuk organizer and a local version of the women’s marches held around the world—signaled the community rallying in the face of an uncertain political future. The Standing Rock event drew 120 people, a third of them had traveled to encampments started by Sioux natives in North Dakota to resist the completion of an oil pipeline that threatens their water supply. Read More →

Obama Blocks Dakota Pipeline

Carley Whitecrane, flanked by her children, joined the march she helped organize in Orleans last week. Despite short notice, 75 people showed to show opposition to completion of the Dakota Access Pipeline. In mid-November Carley and her family traveled to Salem, Oregon, to oppose permits that would allow another fossil fuel pipeline that would cross the Klamath River./Photo by Konrad Fisher, Klamath Riverkeeper. Federal officials from the Army Corps of Engineers announced Sunday that that they would not approve the permit to construct the last leg of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) in its present route across the Missouri River. The decision was met by cheers across the camps at Standing Rock. A , few days before the Army Corps announcement an estimated 75 people joined for a march and rally in Orleans last week to support the water protectors, and they gathered with only one-day notice. To give perspective, the population of Orleans is 500-600. A proportionally large turnout in New York City would be around 1.2 million. Read More →

Karuk Fishermen at Ishi Pishi Falls, Still Dipnet Salmon Traditional Style

Ron Reed, right, explains his views on the losses of Karuk ecological knowledge and the efforts to rebuild it, between passes of dipnet fishing at Ishi Pishi Falls. His companion Brian Tripp, adds his own perspective./Photo by Jayme Kalal. Brian Tripp is well known for his gifts—poet and painter, sculptor and ceremonial singer—but he has another gift besides. He seems able to talk me into things. Read More →

Karuk Tribe Holds Its Own Climate Study Session

Acorn soup was a staple and still looms large in discussions of tribal cultural survival and of food security. When EcoAdapt, a consulting firm, convened a meeting of “stakeholders” in early spring to discuss climate change vulnerability, they dropped tanoak trees from a list of key species. The Karuk Tribe called its own climate assessment meeting this month to present its issues to agencies and to remind them that agencies had a special responsibility to consult with tribes./Photo courtesy of Malcolm Terence.  EcoAdapt, a non-profit outfit, was writing a risk assessment about climate change for the federal land management agencies that control much of Northern California. They invited stakeholders to workshops in the spring. Tribes were invited, but they have long said that they are legally entitled to government-to-government consultation, a level of process that should operate differently than the stakeholder interactions with other groups such as environmental groups, irrigators, and other interested locals. Read More →