Orleans

Obama Blocks Dakota Pipeline

Carley Whitecrane, flanked by her children, joined the march she helped organize in Orleans last week. Despite short notice, 75 people showed to show opposition to completion of the Dakota Access Pipeline. In mid-November Carley and her family traveled to Salem, Oregon, to oppose permits that would allow another fossil fuel pipeline that would cross the Klamath River./Photo by Konrad Fisher, Klamath Riverkeeper. Federal officials from the Army Corps of Engineers announced Sunday that that they would not approve the permit to construct the last leg of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) in its present route across the Missouri River. The decision was met by cheers across the camps at Standing Rock. A , few days before the Army Corps announcement an estimated 75 people joined for a march and rally in Orleans last week to support the water protectors, and they gathered with only one-day notice. To give perspective, the population of Orleans is 500-600. A proportionally large turnout in New York City would be around 1.2 million. Read More →

Karuk Fishermen at Ishi Pishi Falls, Still Dipnet Salmon Traditional Style

Ron Reed, right, explains his views on the losses of Karuk ecological knowledge and the efforts to rebuild it, between passes of dipnet fishing at Ishi Pishi Falls. His companion Brian Tripp, adds his own perspective./Photo by Jayme Kalal. Brian Tripp is well known for his gifts—poet and painter, sculptor and ceremonial singer—but he has another gift besides. He seems able to talk me into things. Read More →

Karuk Tribe Holds Its Own Climate Study Session

Acorn soup was a staple and still looms large in discussions of tribal cultural survival and of food security. When EcoAdapt, a consulting firm, convened a meeting of “stakeholders” in early spring to discuss climate change vulnerability, they dropped tanoak trees from a list of key species. The Karuk Tribe called its own climate assessment meeting this month to present its issues to agencies and to remind them that agencies had a special responsibility to consult with tribes./Photo courtesy of Malcolm Terence.  EcoAdapt, a non-profit outfit, was writing a risk assessment about climate change for the federal land management agencies that control much of Northern California. They invited stakeholders to workshops in the spring. Tribes were invited, but they have long said that they are legally entitled to government-to-government consultation, a level of process that should operate differently than the stakeholder interactions with other groups such as environmental groups, irrigators, and other interested locals. Read More →

Fire Crews Make Progress On Wooley Creek Blaze

Firefighters are battling a wildfire in a tributary of Wooley Creek in the Marble Mountain Wilderness near Somes Bar. Early last week Forest Service officials said the blaze was caused by two lost hikers who lit a signal fire to guide rescuers to their location, according to a TV news report, but by the end of the week spokesmen from the Six Rivers National Forest said only that the fire “was likely human caused, and is under investigation at the moment.” Read More →

Fire on the Mountain

The weather and fuel conditions on the Pony Fire compounded by difficult, even dangerous access made direct attack impossible for firefighters. The fire grew from 10 acres to 150 acres in a few minutes at this point on June 7./Photo by Aja Conrad. Local Volunteers and Rain Help Knock Down Pony Fire, Family Overwhelmed With Support By Malcolm Terence, Two Rivers Tribune Contributing Writer Published on June 28, 2016 in Volume 22, Issue 26 Jeremy Dahl was gardening in his yard between Somes Bar and Happy Camp in early June when he saw smoke boiling up from nearby Pony […] Read More →

More Than Five Hundred Residents Were Without Power

Power outage was due to a tree down on a power line near Fish Lake Road in Bluff Creek./Photo by Leslie Lollich, Two Rivers Tribune Contributing writer.More than 500 residents were without power for about 16 hours last week when trees hit power lines near Bluff Creek. Read More →

Tribe Starts Endowment As Alternative To Grant Funding

Restoration of the fire management regimes used by the tribes in the region is one of the goals of an endowment fund recently started by the Karuk Tribe’s Department of Natural Resources. The fund has already raised $11,425 from 86 contributors, mostly local. Details are available at https://www.gofundme.com/bdjn9ezq. Silk painting by Susan Terence.The Karuk Tribe may not have flocks of rich alumni, but this month its fundraising crossed the threshold to begin its own endowment. Bill Tripp announced that the Karuk Endowment for Eco-Cultural Revitalization had raised $11,555 in four months, not billions, but enough to invest in a portfolio managed by Humboldt Area Foundation (HAF). Read More →

Residents Voice Concerns About Klamath River Dams

More than 20 Orleans area residents expressed their concerns about the dams on the Klamath River at a scoping meeting before California Water Resources Control Board officials last week. All of the speakers said they want the dams removed./Photo by Leslie Lollich, TRT Contributor.An ex Yurok and Karuk water scientist stood up to put on record that “spring Chinook have been suffering since conquest.” He also reminded the water board that the dams would only rightly be considered point source polluters, since, removal of the dams would release accumulated mercury sludge. Pointing out that the dams were a genocidal project, he set the tone for the rest of the meeting. Read More →