Happy Camp

Karuk Fishermen at Ishi Pishi Falls, Still Dipnet Salmon Traditional Style

Ron Reed, right, explains his views on the losses of Karuk ecological knowledge and the efforts to rebuild it, between passes of dipnet fishing at Ishi Pishi Falls. His companion Brian Tripp, adds his own perspective./Photo by Jayme Kalal. Brian Tripp is well known for his gifts—poet and painter, sculptor and ceremonial singer—but he has another gift besides. He seems able to talk me into things. Read More →

Tribe Starts Endowment As Alternative To Grant Funding

Restoration of the fire management regimes used by the tribes in the region is one of the goals of an endowment fund recently started by the Karuk Tribe’s Department of Natural Resources. The fund has already raised $11,425 from 86 contributors, mostly local. Details are available at https://www.gofundme.com/bdjn9ezq. Silk painting by Susan Terence.The Karuk Tribe may not have flocks of rich alumni, but this month its fundraising crossed the threshold to begin its own endowment. Bill Tripp announced that the Karuk Endowment for Eco-Cultural Revitalization had raised $11,555 in four months, not billions, but enough to invest in a portfolio managed by Humboldt Area Foundation (HAF). Read More →

Residents Voice Concerns About Klamath River Dams

More than 20 Orleans area residents expressed their concerns about the dams on the Klamath River at a scoping meeting before California Water Resources Control Board officials last week. All of the speakers said they want the dams removed./Photo by Leslie Lollich, TRT Contributor.An ex Yurok and Karuk water scientist stood up to put on record that “spring Chinook have been suffering since conquest.” He also reminded the water board that the dams would only rightly be considered point source polluters, since, removal of the dams would release accumulated mercury sludge. Pointing out that the dams were a genocidal project, he set the tone for the rest of the meeting. Read More →

New Law Adds Water Board As New Hurdle For Dredges

A miner crouches in the willows along a bank of the Klamath River as he searches for gold with a suction dredge. The Karuk Tribe has led a campaign for ten year to outlaw the practice and a new law from the California Legislature may accomplish their goal./Photo by Stormy Staats. The new law approved by Governor Jerry Brown at the end of 2015 is viewed as a devastating blow by suction dredge miners along the Klamath, but light at the end of a long tunnel for the Karuk Tribe, which has fought for ten years to end the practice because of its threats to water quality and fish survival. Read More →

Forest Management Plans Led By Community

Nearly 50 participants went to the woods to talk about how they would treat forest fuels given the set of six shared values the group had agreed to the year prior during the Western Klamath Restoration Partnership’s first meetings. The Partnership began in 2013 to build bridges between the antagonists of the so-called Timber Wars and continues to meet to prepare forest management plans./Photo by Will Harling, Mid Klamath Watershed Council. One was a law passed in 2002 called the Healthy Forest Initiative. The timber industry welcomed it, but environmental groups renamed it the No-Tree-Left-Behind Act because it seemed to target removal of the larger trees instead of the brush and smaller trees that form the ladder fuels for the most severe burns. Read More →

An Eye on the Future

Laverne Glaze, the elder basket weaver and Karuk activist, shows off a regalia skirt still a work in progress. She reflected, “My life is getting pretty damn short I still need to teach some of these young girls how to sew dresses.”/Photo by Malcolm TerenceGlaze, who spent decades as a promoter and organizer of basketweaving, is now 82 years old and hobbled by arthritis and even occasional difficulty breathing, but she is still working hard with an eye on the future. Read More →

Meeting of the Fire Minds

Learning to burn. The public met in SawyerDuring the summer, one of the driest on record, 220,000 acres were afire in the Klamath Forest and, at the peak, 6,800 firefighters were deployed. It all cost approximately $175 million. The Two Rivers Tribune attended the Salmon River AAR session. The area near the community of Sawyers Bar burned in the White’s Fire and there were a few days when the town itself was threatened. Read More →

Learning to Burn Again

Scott Harding ignites ground fuels with a drip torch at Pearch Creek in Orleans. Agencies, tribes and non-profits sponsored the exercise to build fuels reduction skills in the region. Earlier, Harding was part of a crew that burned the part of his own property that had not burned in last summer’s Butler Fire. Photo by Stormy Staats, Klamath-Salmon Media Collaborative. The burn plans were signed and all the permits finally granted. The crews, packing tools and wearing fire gear, gathered along Gold Dredge Road in Orleans. Firelines were in place. Then they waited, ironically, for the morning dew to dry. Read More →