Forks of Salmon

Karuk Fishermen at Ishi Pishi Falls, Still Dipnet Salmon Traditional Style

Ron Reed, right, explains his views on the losses of Karuk ecological knowledge and the efforts to rebuild it, between passes of dipnet fishing at Ishi Pishi Falls. His companion Brian Tripp, adds his own perspective./Photo by Jayme Kalal. Brian Tripp is well known for his gifts—poet and painter, sculptor and ceremonial singer—but he has another gift besides. He seems able to talk me into things. Read More →

Karuk Tribe Holds Its Own Climate Study Session

Acorn soup was a staple and still looms large in discussions of tribal cultural survival and of food security. When EcoAdapt, a consulting firm, convened a meeting of “stakeholders” in early spring to discuss climate change vulnerability, they dropped tanoak trees from a list of key species. The Karuk Tribe called its own climate assessment meeting this month to present its issues to agencies and to remind them that agencies had a special responsibility to consult with tribes./Photo courtesy of Malcolm Terence.  EcoAdapt, a non-profit outfit, was writing a risk assessment about climate change for the federal land management agencies that control much of Northern California. They invited stakeholders to workshops in the spring. Tribes were invited, but they have long said that they are legally entitled to government-to-government consultation, a level of process that should operate differently than the stakeholder interactions with other groups such as environmental groups, irrigators, and other interested locals. Read More →

Fire Crews Make Progress On Wooley Creek Blaze

Firefighters are battling a wildfire in a tributary of Wooley Creek in the Marble Mountain Wilderness near Somes Bar. Early last week Forest Service officials said the blaze was caused by two lost hikers who lit a signal fire to guide rescuers to their location, according to a TV news report, but by the end of the week spokesmen from the Six Rivers National Forest said only that the fire “was likely human caused, and is under investigation at the moment.” Read More →

River Olympics Stir Competitive Juices And Memories

Students from three schools seem to barely touch the ground in one of the sprint events at last week’s River Olympics at Forks of Salmon Elementary./Photo by Jeff Buchin. Students from three small country schools gathered at Forks of Salmon Elementary School last week for the River Olympics. The annual event stirs many old memories in some and competitive juices in others in a day of grade-school sporting events. Read More →

Tribe Starts Endowment As Alternative To Grant Funding

Restoration of the fire management regimes used by the tribes in the region is one of the goals of an endowment fund recently started by the Karuk Tribe’s Department of Natural Resources. The fund has already raised $11,425 from 86 contributors, mostly local. Details are available at https://www.gofundme.com/bdjn9ezq. Silk painting by Susan Terence.The Karuk Tribe may not have flocks of rich alumni, but this month its fundraising crossed the threshold to begin its own endowment. Bill Tripp announced that the Karuk Endowment for Eco-Cultural Revitalization had raised $11,555 in four months, not billions, but enough to invest in a portfolio managed by Humboldt Area Foundation (HAF). Read More →

Residents Voice Concerns About Klamath River Dams

More than 20 Orleans area residents expressed their concerns about the dams on the Klamath River at a scoping meeting before California Water Resources Control Board officials last week. All of the speakers said they want the dams removed./Photo by Leslie Lollich, TRT Contributor.An ex Yurok and Karuk water scientist stood up to put on record that “spring Chinook have been suffering since conquest.” He also reminded the water board that the dams would only rightly be considered point source polluters, since, removal of the dams would release accumulated mercury sludge. Pointing out that the dams were a genocidal project, he set the tone for the rest of the meeting. Read More →

New Law Adds Water Board As New Hurdle For Dredges

A miner crouches in the willows along a bank of the Klamath River as he searches for gold with a suction dredge. The Karuk Tribe has led a campaign for ten year to outlaw the practice and a new law from the California Legislature may accomplish their goal./Photo by Stormy Staats. The new law approved by Governor Jerry Brown at the end of 2015 is viewed as a devastating blow by suction dredge miners along the Klamath, but light at the end of a long tunnel for the Karuk Tribe, which has fought for ten years to end the practice because of its threats to water quality and fish survival. Read More →

Junction School Surveys The Community

The Junction School survey asks the community about the school climate, school achievement, parent involvement, facilities, attendance and safety./Photo by Leslie Lollich, Two Rivers Tribune Contributor. Parents, grandparents and community members throughout the nation are being asked for input about how public and charter schools should run. Among other ways to get information from residents in the Somes Bar area, surveys recently were posted on Facebook for Junction School. Read More →