Your Town

Feds Give Tribes Green Light to Grow and Sell Marijuana on Tribal Lands

The U.S. Justice Department announced last week that they will not enforce federal marijuana laws on federally recognized tribes that choose to allow it as long as they meet eight federal guidelines, including that marijuana not be sold to minors and not be transported to areas that prohibit it. Local tribes, such as the Hoopa and Yurok Tribes, have strict laws preventing marijuana cultivation and the Justice Department’s recent announcement will not change individual tribal laws. Only the tribes themselves can do that. In Hoopa, a petition was filed on Monday morning to repeal the Tribe’s marijuana prohibition law. If the petition receives the requisite number of signatures it will be placed on a special election ballot to be voted on by Hoopa Valley Tribal Members./Photo courtesy of Arizona Medical Marijuana Community.A U.S. Department of Justice memorandum released last week opens the window for federally recognized tribes to grow and sell marijuana on tribal lands, raising a long debated issue among local tribes that work to suppress large-scale grows because of environmental damage and criminal activity. The memorandum prompted Hoopa Valley tribal member and former tribal chairman Clifford Lyle Marshall, Sr., to file a petition to repeal the Hoopa tribe’s law that prohibits marijuana cultivation on the reservation. Read More →

Tribal Police Officers Collide While Responding to Shots Fired Call

20-50 Police CrashThe lead unit slowed in order to make a U-turn to travel southbound on SR-96. The trailing unit was unable to slow / stop in time. The front of the trailing vehicle struck the left side of the lead vehicle, causing minor injuries to both officers. Read More →

Shedding Light on Problems Along Highway 96

Rod Mendes, director of the Hoopa Valley Tribe’s Office of Emergency Services said that over the next few weeks 14 streetlights will be repaired to improve safety in and around Downtown Hoopa. A concurrent project will improve lighting near local business to deter crime./Photo by Allie Hostler, Two Rivers Tribune A grand total of 14 lights will be installed along the highway and scattered throughout downtown business areas, lighting up parking lots and buildings. Hoopa residents will soon see more lighting in front of Ray’s Food Place, Lucky Bear Casino (LBC), and the Hoopa Tribal Museum. There will also be 12 speed bumps placed strategically throughout this parking lot. Read More →

Hoopa Resident Laura Jordan Graduates UC Davis Medical School

Laura Jordan graduated on May 29, 2014, from U.C.-Medical School. Dr. Laura Jordan has shown through perserverence that childhood dreams can come true./Photo courtesy of Laura JordanIt all started when Laura’s parents, Larry and Angela Jordan, bought their young daughter a toy medical kit. She loved it and always said she wanted to be a doctor. As her dreams began to take shape, Laura was awed when she heard there was a female Native American doctor working at K’ima:w Medical Center (KMC) in Hoopa. Read More →

An Eye on the Future

Laverne Glaze, the elder basket weaver and Karuk activist, shows off a regalia skirt still a work in progress. She reflected, “My life is getting pretty damn short I still need to teach some of these young girls how to sew dresses.”/Photo by Malcolm TerenceGlaze, who spent decades as a promoter and organizer of basketweaving, is now 82 years old and hobbled by arthritis and even occasional difficulty breathing, but she is still working hard with an eye on the future. Read More →

Deadly Roads

Although hardly scientific, on Monday, November 24, the Two Rivers Tribune observed pedestrian traffic at 2 pm in downtown Hoopa. Within five minutes 10 pedestrians were counted within a 200-foot radius of the Hoopa Mini-Mart, half of whom crossed the highway without using either of the two crosswalks. One pedestrian was observed using the crosswalk. Hoopa, Karuk and Yurok lands amount to less than 25 percent of Humboldt County’s total land mass, but these areas were the site of 33 percent of all traffic related fatalities in 2009, and over 50 percent of the county’s fatalities in 2008. Read More →

Willow Creek Resident Promoted to Captain of Eureka Police Department

Brian Stephens has served 16 years with the Eureka Police Department. He worked consistently towards gaining experience and law enforcement achievements throughout the course of his career. Stephens said that being promoted to captain of the EPD is a humbling experience./Photo by Rhonda Bigovich, Two Rivers TribuneStephens gave a wide grin and said, “When I was a young kid I wanted to play baseball. I kind of held onto that dream until I was a senior in high school, then I realized that even though I was good, I wasn’t Major League material.” Read More →

Meeting of the Fire Minds

Learning to burn. The public met in SawyerDuring the summer, one of the driest on record, 220,000 acres were afire in the Klamath Forest and, at the peak, 6,800 firefighters were deployed. It all cost approximately $175 million. The Two Rivers Tribune attended the Salmon River AAR session. The area near the community of Sawyers Bar burned in the White’s Fire and there were a few days when the town itself was threatened. Read More →