Your Town

Learning to Burn Again

Scott Harding ignites ground fuels with a drip torch at Pearch Creek in Orleans. Agencies, tribes and non-profits sponsored the exercise to build fuels reduction skills in the region. Earlier, Harding was part of a crew that burned the part of his own property that had not burned in last summer’s Butler Fire. Photo by Stormy Staats, Klamath-Salmon Media Collaborative. The burn plans were signed and all the permits finally granted. The crews, packing tools and wearing fire gear, gathered along Gold Dredge Road in Orleans. Firelines were in place. Then they waited, ironically, for the morning dew to dry. Read More →

Somes Bar Builder Tries Old Methods To Build Houses of the Future

Dillon Creasy built frame of massive timbers, all cut from local trees, after the foundation and floor slab were poured. The next step would be the construction of thick walls packed with straw infused with a wet clay slurry./Photo courtesy of Dillon Creasy.  Creasy says that homes built with the same methods in Europe 800 years ago are still in use. The straw content of the walls would make them seem vulnerable to rot and fire but the infusion of the clay slurry just before the packing stage adds durability. Read More →

Bear Activity on the Rise

The Black Bear population is Humboldt County has been determined to be stable, not increasing nor decreasing. Wildlife Biologist Dave Lancaster said, currently there are approximately four migrating bears per square mile./Photo courtesy of Pamela Mattz “He comes everyday at this point.” Mattz said. “And he plows through everything. He cleans everything, and he will stand there and stare at me. I watch for as long as I can before he freaks me out. I don’t know if he was going to attack or what he might do. Although he seems really mellow, he still is a wild animal.” Read More →

Reclamation Releases More Water to Combat Fish Kill Parasite

After touring the Trinity and Klamath Rivers in early August, Bureau of Reclamation Regional Director, David Murillo (left), at the urging of scientists, tribes and activists, chose to allow more water to flow from the Trinity to prevent a catastrophic fish kill in the Klamath River. /Photo by Allie Hostler, Two Rivers Tribune“This documented presence of ich before the flows arrived does fit the understanding that ich is basically just lurking there at undetectable levels until the right conditions come about and encourage it to spread and grow,” Strange said. “Things were definitely set up for another fish kill and the flows interrupted it, but not at the level that has completely prevented the parasite from getting a foothold and it appears to be on the rise as those flows are ending. Unfortunately, our full preventive flow recommendations were never met and the preseason run size forecast appears to have significantly under estimated the number of salmon coming back to the river this fall.” Read More →

Bald Hill Three Fire Burns Fast and Hot

The Bald Hill Three Fire was started by heavy equipment on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation on Friday afternoon. On Monday the fire was 85 percent contained and expected to be extinguished by Wednesday. Several families were evacuated from their homes on Friday and able to return the following day. No homes were lost./Photo by Allie Hostler, Two Rivers TribuneBy RHONDA BIGOVICH, Two Rivers Tribune On Friday, Sept. 12, at around 3pm, an accidental fire was lit by a piece of heavy equipment at a Bald Hill logging site. A diesel engine caught fire and quickly created a catastrophe for Bald Hill residents, some of whom were ordered to evacuate their residence. The Bald […] Read More →

Acquiring Skills in a Good Way

NDN Center staff from left to right: Thomas Gordon, Erika Chase, Ginger Rogers and Lea Pratt./Photo courtesy of Ginger RogersEarlier that morning, Rogers had reeled through Hupa words for human anatomy in a class of seventh graders at Hoopa Elementary school. The students circled around her slapped their knees, pointed to their eyes, ears, mouth and heads over and over, never once wearying of the repetition. Some shouted, while others mouthed silently. Sometimes they had the right body part, and sometimes not. They all tried, and they got better even just in a few minutes time. Read More →

Vandalism, Theft and Compulsive Arrangement in Willow Creek

 Children’s clothing and numerous other objects were found on Wednesday, May 7 inside the shed at the VFW Cemetery after a mowing crew discovered the lock broken. RIGHT: A child’s backpack with a name stenciled on the back was also found in the cemetery shed along along with items apparently arranged into some sort of a pattern for unknown reasons. “We have a wheelbarrow in there, and it was full of young children’s clothing. There was a girl’s jacket, a little kid’s ball cap, some baby booties, a kid’s pullover, a couple pairs of socks and a backpack with a little girl’s name stenciled on the front of it,” she said. Read More →

History Deeper Than a Thousand Walnut Roots

Nicole Ammon tells the stories that make up her family history, mostly surrounding the ranch house she recently restored./Photo by Allie Hostler, Two Rivers TribuneHe also frequented the Indian School in Hupa and was well-liked according to historical accounts found in the Susie Baker Fountain Papers at Humboldt State University. Nicolé said it became too difficult for Fountain to transport goods and supplies over the old single-file mule bridge so he decided to build a bridge that could support motorized vehicles. Read More →