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Karuk Fishermen at Ishi Pishi Falls, Still Dipnet Salmon Traditional Style

Ron Reed, right, explains his views on the losses of Karuk ecological knowledge and the efforts to rebuild it, between passes of dipnet fishing at Ishi Pishi Falls. His companion Brian Tripp, adds his own perspective./Photo by Jayme Kalal. Brian Tripp is well known for his gifts—poet and painter, sculptor and ceremonial singer—but he has another gift besides. He seems able to talk me into things. Read More →

For Native Students, Education’s Promise Has Long Been Broken

I read an article in the July 26, 2016 online edition of the Chronicle of Higher Education titled “For Native Students, Education’s Promise Has Long Been Broken” by Kelly Field that I thought was particularly interesting and salient to College of the Redwoods. The author discussed the incredible challenges—poverty, joblessness, addiction, and abuse—Native peoples confront in Blackfeet reservation community in Browning, Montana and the anxiety young people face when they leave the reservation for college. I came away from reading the article with a profound appreciation for what our Klamath Trinity Instructional Site (KTIS) colleagues have accomplished in creating an extraordinary student success environment that supports our Native students’ academic achievement in Hoopa. Read More →

Karuk Tribe Holds Its Own Climate Study Session

Acorn soup was a staple and still looms large in discussions of tribal cultural survival and of food security. When EcoAdapt, a consulting firm, convened a meeting of “stakeholders” in early spring to discuss climate change vulnerability, they dropped tanoak trees from a list of key species. The Karuk Tribe called its own climate assessment meeting this month to present its issues to agencies and to remind them that agencies had a special responsibility to consult with tribes./Photo courtesy of Malcolm Terence.  EcoAdapt, a non-profit outfit, was writing a risk assessment about climate change for the federal land management agencies that control much of Northern California. They invited stakeholders to workshops in the spring. Tribes were invited, but they have long said that they are legally entitled to government-to-government consultation, a level of process that should operate differently than the stakeholder interactions with other groups such as environmental groups, irrigators, and other interested locals. Read More →

Humboldt County Sheriff Swears In Hoopa Tribal Police Officers

From left to right: Humboldt County Sheriff, Mike Downey; Hoopa Valley Tribal Police Officers Angel Yanez, Blake Hostler and Karl Norton; and Hoopa Valley Tribal Chairman, Ryan Jackson./Photo by Keterah Lipscomb, Two Rivers TribuneOn July 7, Blake Hostler and Angel Yanez were sworn in as police officers by Humboldt County Sheriff Mike Downey. Chairman Ryan Jackson of the Hoopa Valley Tribe attended as well as Interim Chief of Police Karl Norton. Read More →

Fire Crews Make Progress On Wooley Creek Blaze

Firefighters are battling a wildfire in a tributary of Wooley Creek in the Marble Mountain Wilderness near Somes Bar. Early last week Forest Service officials said the blaze was caused by two lost hikers who lit a signal fire to guide rescuers to their location, according to a TV news report, but by the end of the week spokesmen from the Six Rivers National Forest said only that the fire “was likely human caused, and is under investigation at the moment.” Read More →

Fire on the Mountain

The weather and fuel conditions on the Pony Fire compounded by difficult, even dangerous access made direct attack impossible for firefighters. The fire grew from 10 acres to 150 acres in a few minutes at this point on June 7./Photo by Aja Conrad. Local Volunteers and Rain Help Knock Down Pony Fire, Family Overwhelmed With Support By Malcolm Terence, Two Rivers Tribune Contributing Writer Published on June 28, 2016 in Volume 22, Issue 26 Jeremy Dahl was gardening in his yard between Somes Bar and Happy Camp in early June when he saw smoke boiling up from nearby Pony […] Read More →

Hoopa Valley Tribe Acts To Protect Public Health and Safety

Last week, C&K Markets was informed by the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services of their concern about a rodent problem at the store and surrounding area. They have since accelerated pest control efforts already in place for a more aggressive solution with a professional pest control company. In addition to the rodent problem, a leaky roof was allowing water to drip down onto fresh produce. A drainage problem was found in the meat department. Polystyrene trays in the meat department were also found to be chewed by rodents./Photo by Keterah Lipscomb, Two Rivers TribuneThe Hoopa Valley Tribe was notified of an extensive rodent infestation in a building it leases to Ray’s Food Place grocery store, which is owned by C & K Market, Inc., on June 10, 2016. In response, Tribal Chairman Ryan Jackson issued a statement to the Hoopa Valley community on Facebook on June 11, 2016, calling the conditions identified in a report by the Indian Health Service, “wholly unacceptable.” Read More →

River Olympics Stir Competitive Juices And Memories

Students from three schools seem to barely touch the ground in one of the sprint events at last week’s River Olympics at Forks of Salmon Elementary./Photo by Jeff Buchin. Students from three small country schools gathered at Forks of Salmon Elementary School last week for the River Olympics. The annual event stirs many old memories in some and competitive juices in others in a day of grade-school sporting events. Read More →