Your Town

Talking Pot, Cannabis, Marijuana and Flowers in Hoopa

Jack Norton (center) was recently appointed by the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council as a political advisor on marijuana issues./Photo by Allie Hostler, Two Rivers Tribune.A citizen initiative to repeal the Hoopa Valley Tribe’s Title 34 slated for the April 28 primary election ballot has conversations at council, community and kitchen tables on the rise. Read More →

54th Annual All-Indian Basketball Tournament

54th Annual All-Indian Basketball Tournament Royalty.The 54th Annual All Indian Basketball Tournament brought teams from around Indian Country together for a weekend of friendly competition and fun. As is traditional, local young women compete for tournament royalty positions by fundraising in the community. The proceeds help pay tournament expenses. From left to right: 2015 Little Princess Tylie McKinnon, 2015 Queen […] Read More →

Lucky Day

21-11 Joe OHaraVolunteers of the Willow Creek Fire Safe Council held their annual corned beef and cabbage feed fundraiser on Friday, March 13. The Fire Safe Council is currently promoting the Fire Adapted Landscapes and Safe Homes (FLASH)  program. FLASH is a cost share program designed to assist property owners with the job of reducing their risk […] Read More →

Senior Prank Gone Wrong

A dead deer was found on the Hoopa Valley High School Gymnasium floor on Tuesday, March 10.Shock and great sadness overcame students, staff, and the community last Tuesday morning, March 10, when an unused deer carcass was found lying in the center of Hoopa Valley High School’s gymnasium floor. Read More →

Forest Management Plans Led By Community

Nearly 50 participants went to the woods to talk about how they would treat forest fuels given the set of six shared values the group had agreed to the year prior during the Western Klamath Restoration Partnership’s first meetings. The Partnership began in 2013 to build bridges between the antagonists of the so-called Timber Wars and continues to meet to prepare forest management plans./Photo by Will Harling, Mid Klamath Watershed Council. One was a law passed in 2002 called the Healthy Forest Initiative. The timber industry welcomed it, but environmental groups renamed it the No-Tree-Left-Behind Act because it seemed to target removal of the larger trees instead of the brush and smaller trees that form the ladder fuels for the most severe burns. Read More →

Pookey’s Snack Shack Burned

21-1 Pookey  On the morning of January 3, 2015, around 8:45 a.m., the Pookey’s Park snack bar was observed fully engulfed in flames. There was electricity running to the building, however it is unknown at this time if the fire was arson or electricity-related. Hoopa’s Department of Physical Health and Recreation Director, Joe Davis, said two […] Read More →

Orphan Cub Finds Home Plate for the Holidays

Web 4  An orphaned bear cub decided to go to school today. The cub climbed up the fence behind home plate on the High School boy’s baseball field on Highway 96. Hoopa Valley Tribal Forestry wildlife biologist Mark Higley said the cub likely wandered down from the nearby mountains in search of food and became frightened. […] Read More →

Feds Give Tribes Green Light to Grow and Sell Marijuana on Tribal Lands

The U.S. Justice Department announced last week that they will not enforce federal marijuana laws on federally recognized tribes that choose to allow it as long as they meet eight federal guidelines, including that marijuana not be sold to minors and not be transported to areas that prohibit it. Local tribes, such as the Hoopa and Yurok Tribes, have strict laws preventing marijuana cultivation and the Justice Department’s recent announcement will not change individual tribal laws. Only the tribes themselves can do that. In Hoopa, a petition was filed on Monday morning to repeal the Tribe’s marijuana prohibition law. If the petition receives the requisite number of signatures it will be placed on a special election ballot to be voted on by Hoopa Valley Tribal Members./Photo courtesy of Arizona Medical Marijuana Community.A U.S. Department of Justice memorandum released last week opens the window for federally recognized tribes to grow and sell marijuana on tribal lands, raising a long debated issue among local tribes that work to suppress large-scale grows because of environmental damage and criminal activity. The memorandum prompted Hoopa Valley tribal member and former tribal chairman Clifford Lyle Marshall, Sr., to file a petition to repeal the Hoopa tribe’s law that prohibits marijuana cultivation on the reservation. Read More →