River Watch

Youth Protest Pollution From Klamath Strait Drain

Youth protestors lay on the ground in front of the Klamath County Government Office, representing the image of past fish kills on the Klamath river largely due to contamination and low flows./Photo courtesy of Youth Coalition for Clean Klamath. KLAMATH FALLS, Ore.–Monday, July 18, a group of youth including members of several tribes, orchestrated three dynamic protests to demand a thorough clean-up of the polluted Klamath Strait Drain, which pumps polluted water into the Klamath River, harming down river communities and Klamath salmon. Read More →

Slack Management of Wilderness Grazing gets Scrutiny from Tribes and Environmentalists

Tonya Lindsey, an environmental assistant from the Quartz Valley Indian Reservation, takes water samples from lower Shackleford Creek as part of the Tribe’s ongoing study of the effects of cattle grazing allotments in the headwaters. A sweat lodge shell is in the background. /Photo courtesy of Quartz Valley Indian Reservation.There was a question of what might be the source, possibly recreational hikers in the wilderness, but the University of Montana conducted a statistical analysis with the first seven years of the Quartz Valley Tribe’s survey to determine where the highest concentrations might be coming from. It is available online at http://goo.gl/3ZzZpv. Read More →

San Luis Settlement Agreement Would Forever Condemn The Hoopa Valley Tribe to Poverty

The Hoopa Valley Tribe filed its objection today to two bills proposed in the House of Representatives H.R. 4366 and H.R. 5217 intended to implement the San Luis Settlement Agreement. Read More →

Klamath Dam Removal May Proceed Without KBRA

The owner of four Klamath River hydroelectric dams along with the Department of Interior and the states of Oregon and California signed an Agreement in Principal on February 2, a formal, but non-binding document that declares their intention to work with the parties of the Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement (KHSA) to amend the KHSA in order to facilitate the removal of four dams on the Klamath River.The initiative by the Department of Interior, the states and the dam owner may accomplish the action most important to Tribes, conservationists and fishermen, but pays limited attention to the water access issues most important to upper basin farmers and irrigators. Read More →

Residents Voice Concerns About Klamath River Dams

More than 20 Orleans area residents expressed their concerns about the dams on the Klamath River at a scoping meeting before California Water Resources Control Board officials last week. All of the speakers said they want the dams removed./Photo by Leslie Lollich, TRT Contributor.An ex Yurok and Karuk water scientist stood up to put on record that “spring Chinook have been suffering since conquest.” He also reminded the water board that the dams would only rightly be considered point source polluters, since, removal of the dams would release accumulated mercury sludge. Pointing out that the dams were a genocidal project, he set the tone for the rest of the meeting. Read More →

New Law Adds Water Board As New Hurdle For Dredges

A miner crouches in the willows along a bank of the Klamath River as he searches for gold with a suction dredge. The Karuk Tribe has led a campaign for ten year to outlaw the practice and a new law from the California Legislature may accomplish their goal./Photo by Stormy Staats. The new law approved by Governor Jerry Brown at the end of 2015 is viewed as a devastating blow by suction dredge miners along the Klamath, but light at the end of a long tunnel for the Karuk Tribe, which has fought for ten years to end the practice because of its threats to water quality and fish survival. Read More →

Supply Creek Restoration Project

New Supply Creek Diversions have been made and this work will increase the amount of high quality in-stream habitat available for salmon throughout various stream flow conditions./Photo by Keterah Lipscomb, Two Rivers Tribune.The 2015 restoration work was needed because the 1964 flood destroyed salmon, steelhead and Pacific lamprey habitat. Deep pools and winter habitat were impaired. Emergency repairs by the Army Corps of Engineers created levees and channels which constrain salmon, steelhead trout and Pacific lamprey habitat. Read More →

River Activists and Tribes Prepare For Water Board Public Hearings in Orleans, Arcata and Yreka

Former Hoopa Valley Tribal Council Member, Hayley Hutt shown outside of the California Water Resources Control Board Meeting in Sacramento on  July 17, 2012, where the Hoopa Tribe has continually asked the Water Board to stop stalling the 401 Clean Water Certification process for PacifiCorp. The Hoopa Valley Tribe has argued that stalling the 401 certification process only buys PacifCorp more without being accoutnable for the poor water quality conditions their dams cause on the Klamath River./TRT file photo. The schedule includes a meeting Thursday, January 14, in Sacramento, then meetings in Arcata on Monday, January 25, and in Orleans and Yreka, both on Tuesday, January 26. The Orleans session is an add-on requested by the Karuk Tribe in their effort to encourage more input from people in the river communities. It is a step in the process open to both scientists and to locals who may want to make sure the Water Board does not overlook any issue dam opponents consider important. Read More →