Environment

Worst Salmon Run on Record

TRT File PhotoThe total tribal allocation—which must be shared amongst the Hoopa and Yurok Tribes—is set at about 814 adult salmon. Typically the Yurok Tribe claims 80 percent of the harvest allocation and the Hoopa Tribe claims the remaining 20 percent. That’s about 650 fish for the Yurok Tribe and about 160 for the Hoopa Tribe. Read More →

Electrical Outages Top Historical Humboldt County Averages

Cherry Flat in Hoopa, January 2017 Storm./Two Rivers Tribune file photo.The 2016/2017 winter storms dropped hundreds, if not thousands of snow-loaded trees on electrical lines in Humboldt County, especially in communities along the Highway 96 corridor from Willow Creek to Somes Bar. Read More →

Mill Creek Restoration in Full Swing

Mill Creek Restoration Plan./Map courtesy of the Hoopa Valley Tribal Fisheries Department.Baby salmon need protection from a swath of threats awaiting them after they hatch. If they are strong enough to survive one-to-two years in fresh water, they might make it to the sea where they feed and mature into adults, swim back to their natal stream to spawn and complete their lifecycle. Read More →

Hoopa Valley Tribe and Federal Emergency Management Agency Signing Ceremony

February 22, the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council, FEMA, Hoopa OES Incident Command Team and BIA representatives take a break for a photo opportunity after the signing ceremony./Photo by Teresa Mitchell, Two Rivers Tribune.On Wednesday February 22, The Hoopa Valley Tribe and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) held a signing ceremony for the major disaster declaration President Trump approved for the Hoopa Valley Tribe. Read More →

Hoopa Valley Tribe Applauds Appeals Court’s Decision To Uphold Life-Saving Water Releases For Hoopa Fish

20140711_Final_KBCV_map_2nd_edToday, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld water releases to the Trinity River to prevent salmon die-off downstream. Since the horrific 2002 salmon kill on the Lower Klamath River, the Bureau of Reclamation has released supplemental water from the Trinity River Reservoir on numerous occasions to prevent similar fish kills. Read More →

Hoopa Valley Tribe Wins Court Case to Protect Salmon

Hoopa Water Team-Mike Orcutt, Danny Jordan, Chairman Ryan Jackson, Tom Schlosser.On Wednesday, February 8, A United States District Court judge ruled that federal agencies must take preventative and emergency measures to reduce the incidence of disease among juvenile salmon, the major source of mortality limiting runs of returning adults to the Klamath River and its tributaries. This decision was welcomed by the Hoopa Valley Tribe, who initiated the lawsuit challenging the federal government’s inaction given two years of high disease rates and poor adult returns. Read More →

Hundreds Attend Memorial for Basket Weaver and Organizer in Orleans

Nearly 50 marchers left Orleans School headed for the bridge across the Klamath River. By the time they got there, their numbers had nearly doubled. Add that to the definition of River Time./Photo by Konrad Fisher, Klamath Riverkeeper. People gathered in large numbers in Orleans over the last week at three events. Each of them—a story-telling dinner with Standing Rock veterans, the memorial for a well-known Karuk organizer and a local version of the women’s marches held around the world—signaled the community rallying in the face of an uncertain political future. The Standing Rock event drew 120 people, a third of them had traveled to encampments started by Sioux natives in North Dakota to resist the completion of an oil pipeline that threatens their water supply. Read More →

Obama Blocks Dakota Pipeline

Carley Whitecrane, flanked by her children, joined the march she helped organize in Orleans last week. Despite short notice, 75 people showed to show opposition to completion of the Dakota Access Pipeline. In mid-November Carley and her family traveled to Salem, Oregon, to oppose permits that would allow another fossil fuel pipeline that would cross the Klamath River./Photo by Konrad Fisher, Klamath Riverkeeper. Federal officials from the Army Corps of Engineers announced Sunday that that they would not approve the permit to construct the last leg of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) in its present route across the Missouri River. The decision was met by cheers across the camps at Standing Rock. A , few days before the Army Corps announcement an estimated 75 people joined for a march and rally in Orleans last week to support the water protectors, and they gathered with only one-day notice. To give perspective, the population of Orleans is 500-600. A proportionally large turnout in New York City would be around 1.2 million. Read More →