Environment

Feds Give Tribes Green Light to Grow and Sell Marijuana on Tribal Lands

The U.S. Justice Department announced last week that they will not enforce federal marijuana laws on federally recognized tribes that choose to allow it as long as they meet eight federal guidelines, including that marijuana not be sold to minors and not be transported to areas that prohibit it. Local tribes, such as the Hoopa and Yurok Tribes, have strict laws preventing marijuana cultivation and the Justice Department’s recent announcement will not change individual tribal laws. Only the tribes themselves can do that. In Hoopa, a petition was filed on Monday morning to repeal the Tribe’s marijuana prohibition law. If the petition receives the requisite number of signatures it will be placed on a special election ballot to be voted on by Hoopa Valley Tribal Members./Photo courtesy of Arizona Medical Marijuana Community.A U.S. Department of Justice memorandum released last week opens the window for federally recognized tribes to grow and sell marijuana on tribal lands, raising a long debated issue among local tribes that work to suppress large-scale grows because of environmental damage and criminal activity. The memorandum prompted Hoopa Valley tribal member and former tribal chairman Clifford Lyle Marshall, Sr., to file a petition to repeal the Hoopa tribe’s law that prohibits marijuana cultivation on the reservation. Read More →

Meeting of the Fire Minds

Learning to burn. The public met in SawyerDuring the summer, one of the driest on record, 220,000 acres were afire in the Klamath Forest and, at the peak, 6,800 firefighters were deployed. It all cost approximately $175 million. The Two Rivers Tribune attended the Salmon River AAR session. The area near the community of Sawyers Bar burned in the White’s Fire and there were a few days when the town itself was threatened. Read More →

Surveillance and Sewage

The Willow Creek Community Services District Board of Directors met for their regular meeting last Thursday. They discussed the process to gain permission to install surveillance cameras throughout downtown Willow Creek. The next WCCSD meeting will be held on December 18 at 8 am./Photo by Bill Vassilakis, TRT contributing writer.The board then turned its attention to the meat of the meeting: Unfinished Business, in the shape of 1) a plan recently taking shape to install a system of surveillance cameras downtown, and 2) an engineering report on a wastewater system that’s been in the works for years. Though the hired consulting engineers were eager to tell their septic system story and be on their way, the meeting’s attention would first linger on the camera plan, which had finally found a forthright critic. Read More →

Nip it in the Bud

Peach leaf curl is a fungus that can severely damage the productivity of a tree or even kill it./Photo courtesy of the University of Missouri Agricultural Extension. Most gardeners in the Klamath-Trinity have encountered Peach Leaf Curl – the curled, deformed leaves that appear on peaches and nectarines in the early spring. Problem is, by the time it’s visible it is already too late to treat it; in fact, the ideal window for controlling peach leaf curl is coming up in early to mid-December. Read More →

Learning to Burn Again

Scott Harding ignites ground fuels with a drip torch at Pearch Creek in Orleans. Agencies, tribes and non-profits sponsored the exercise to build fuels reduction skills in the region. Earlier, Harding was part of a crew that burned the part of his own property that had not burned in last summer’s Butler Fire. Photo by Stormy Staats, Klamath-Salmon Media Collaborative. The burn plans were signed and all the permits finally granted. The crews, packing tools and wearing fire gear, gathered along Gold Dredge Road in Orleans. Firelines were in place. Then they waited, ironically, for the morning dew to dry. Read More →

Trespass Marijuana Plantations Wreak Havoc in Trinity Alps Wilderness

Army, National Guard and other law enforcement officers prepare to load the helicopter with irrigation line, garbage and a few remnant marijuana plants./Photos by Allie Hostler, Two Rivers TribuneThe sites encompass habitat of the federally endangered coho salmon, federally threatened northern spotted owl and the Pacific fisher, which was recently proposed for listing as federally threatened. Scientific data conclusively proves how pollution from illegal marijuana cultivation has further degraded habitat quality for each species and how bioaccumulating rodenticides, common to illegal cultivation sites, continue to negatively affect the northern spotted owl and Pacific fisher. Read More →

Somes Bar Builder Tries Old Methods To Build Houses of the Future

Dillon Creasy built frame of massive timbers, all cut from local trees, after the foundation and floor slab were poured. The next step would be the construction of thick walls packed with straw infused with a wet clay slurry./Photo courtesy of Dillon Creasy.  Creasy says that homes built with the same methods in Europe 800 years ago are still in use. The straw content of the walls would make them seem vulnerable to rot and fire but the infusion of the clay slurry just before the packing stage adds durability. Read More →

Bear Activity on the Rise

The Black Bear population is Humboldt County has been determined to be stable, not increasing nor decreasing. Wildlife Biologist Dave Lancaster said, currently there are approximately four migrating bears per square mile./Photo courtesy of Pamela Mattz “He comes everyday at this point.” Mattz said. “And he plows through everything. He cleans everything, and he will stand there and stare at me. I watch for as long as I can before he freaks me out. I don’t know if he was going to attack or what he might do. Although he seems really mellow, he still is a wild animal.” Read More →