Economy

Feds Give Tribes Green Light to Grow and Sell Marijuana on Tribal Lands

The U.S. Justice Department announced last week that they will not enforce federal marijuana laws on federally recognized tribes that choose to allow it as long as they meet eight federal guidelines, including that marijuana not be sold to minors and not be transported to areas that prohibit it. Local tribes, such as the Hoopa and Yurok Tribes, have strict laws preventing marijuana cultivation and the Justice Department’s recent announcement will not change individual tribal laws. Only the tribes themselves can do that. In Hoopa, a petition was filed on Monday morning to repeal the Tribe’s marijuana prohibition law. If the petition receives the requisite number of signatures it will be placed on a special election ballot to be voted on by Hoopa Valley Tribal Members./Photo courtesy of Arizona Medical Marijuana Community.A U.S. Department of Justice memorandum released last week opens the window for federally recognized tribes to grow and sell marijuana on tribal lands, raising a long debated issue among local tribes that work to suppress large-scale grows because of environmental damage and criminal activity. The memorandum prompted Hoopa Valley tribal member and former tribal chairman Clifford Lyle Marshall, Sr., to file a petition to repeal the Hoopa tribe’s law that prohibits marijuana cultivation on the reservation. Read More →

Meeting of the Fire Minds

Learning to burn. The public met in SawyerDuring the summer, one of the driest on record, 220,000 acres were afire in the Klamath Forest and, at the peak, 6,800 firefighters were deployed. It all cost approximately $175 million. The Two Rivers Tribune attended the Salmon River AAR session. The area near the community of Sawyers Bar burned in the White’s Fire and there were a few days when the town itself was threatened. Read More →

Surveillance and Sewage

The Willow Creek Community Services District Board of Directors met for their regular meeting last Thursday. They discussed the process to gain permission to install surveillance cameras throughout downtown Willow Creek. The next WCCSD meeting will be held on December 18 at 8 am./Photo by Bill Vassilakis, TRT contributing writer.The board then turned its attention to the meat of the meeting: Unfinished Business, in the shape of 1) a plan recently taking shape to install a system of surveillance cameras downtown, and 2) an engineering report on a wastewater system that’s been in the works for years. Though the hired consulting engineers were eager to tell their septic system story and be on their way, the meeting’s attention would first linger on the camera plan, which had finally found a forthright critic. Read More →

Trespass Marijuana Plantations Wreak Havoc in Trinity Alps Wilderness

Army, National Guard and other law enforcement officers prepare to load the helicopter with irrigation line, garbage and a few remnant marijuana plants./Photos by Allie Hostler, Two Rivers TribuneThe sites encompass habitat of the federally endangered coho salmon, federally threatened northern spotted owl and the Pacific fisher, which was recently proposed for listing as federally threatened. Scientific data conclusively proves how pollution from illegal marijuana cultivation has further degraded habitat quality for each species and how bioaccumulating rodenticides, common to illegal cultivation sites, continue to negatively affect the northern spotted owl and Pacific fisher. Read More →

Reclamation Releases More Water to Combat Fish Kill Parasite

After touring the Trinity and Klamath Rivers in early August, Bureau of Reclamation Regional Director, David Murillo (left), at the urging of scientists, tribes and activists, chose to allow more water to flow from the Trinity to prevent a catastrophic fish kill in the Klamath River. /Photo by Allie Hostler, Two Rivers Tribune“This documented presence of ich before the flows arrived does fit the understanding that ich is basically just lurking there at undetectable levels until the right conditions come about and encourage it to spread and grow,” Strange said. “Things were definitely set up for another fish kill and the flows interrupted it, but not at the level that has completely prevented the parasite from getting a foothold and it appears to be on the rise as those flows are ending. Unfortunately, our full preventive flow recommendations were never met and the preseason run size forecast appears to have significantly under estimated the number of salmon coming back to the river this fall.” Read More →

Eel River Disposal and Tom’s Trash Compromise on Willow Creek Franchise

Local owned Tom’s Trash is amidst negotiations with Eel River Disposal to continue garbage services in the Willow Creek area. They have reached an agreement that is pending county legal review./TRT file photo. After various meetings with Eel River Disposal, Tom’s Trash owner Josh McKnight is confident that a compromised contract proposal will keep his 40-year-old business in business. Read More →

Q & A With the Next DA

The Two Rivers Tribune posed four questions to the four candidates for the Humboldt County District Attorney seat. The primary election will be held on June 3, 2014. Click here to read their responses. Read More →

Scientists, Tribes, Firefighters Trade Solutions

Carl Skinner was just one month from retirement last week, the final stretch in a long, productive career. It’s the month when many are tempted into short-timer minimalism, but instead he traveled to Orleans for three busy days of conferencing with fire managers, tribal practitioners, fire-aware locals and other scientist-researchers like himself. Read More →