Business

Hoopa Valley Tribe Acts To Protect Public Health and Safety

Last week, C&K Markets was informed by the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services of their concern about a rodent problem at the store and surrounding area. They have since accelerated pest control efforts already in place for a more aggressive solution with a professional pest control company. In addition to the rodent problem, a leaky roof was allowing water to drip down onto fresh produce. A drainage problem was found in the meat department. Polystyrene trays in the meat department were also found to be chewed by rodents./Photo by Keterah Lipscomb, Two Rivers TribuneThe Hoopa Valley Tribe was notified of an extensive rodent infestation in a building it leases to Ray’s Food Place grocery store, which is owned by C & K Market, Inc., on June 10, 2016. In response, Tribal Chairman Ryan Jackson issued a statement to the Hoopa Valley community on Facebook on June 11, 2016, calling the conditions identified in a report by the Indian Health Service, “wholly unacceptable.” Read More →

Residents Voice Concerns About Klamath River Dams

More than 20 Orleans area residents expressed their concerns about the dams on the Klamath River at a scoping meeting before California Water Resources Control Board officials last week. All of the speakers said they want the dams removed./Photo by Leslie Lollich, TRT Contributor.An ex Yurok and Karuk water scientist stood up to put on record that “spring Chinook have been suffering since conquest.” He also reminded the water board that the dams would only rightly be considered point source polluters, since, removal of the dams would release accumulated mercury sludge. Pointing out that the dams were a genocidal project, he set the tone for the rest of the meeting. Read More →

Trinity County Holds Its First Medical Marijuana Forum

As rain pounded Northern California on Saturday January 16, the crowd at the North Fork Grange Hall in Junction City, swelled to standing room only with an overflow crowd outside of the door. Although Highway 299 was closed due to a rock slide, one speaker, Conner McIntee, a scientist from the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board, made it to the meeting by kayaking up the Trinity River to bypass the slide./Photo by Dave Garrison, Two Rivers Tribune Contributor.As rain pounded Northern California on Saturday January 16, the crowd at the North Fork Grange Hall in Junction City, swelled to standing room only with an overflow crowd outside of the door. Fifteen miles to the west a rock slide dammed highway 299 stopping traffic in both directions for several days. Read More →

Bigfoot Equipment and Willow Creek VFW Burglarized

Ready Davis (left) and Chris Hern (right) surveyed the damage to their Willow Creek shop, Bigfoot Equipment and Repair after being burglarized on the evening of Saturday, January 2. Video surveillance shows the SUV stop briefly in front of the double glass doors of the saw shop, then proceed to slowly drive through the doors. The vehicle then backed up and left the headlights on. Two occupants then exited the vehicle, entered the store and proceeded to take five Husqvarna chainsaws. Read More →

Talking Pot, Cannabis, Marijuana and Flowers in Hoopa

Jack Norton (center) was recently appointed by the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council as a political advisor on marijuana issues./Photo by Allie Hostler, Two Rivers Tribune.A citizen initiative to repeal the Hoopa Valley Tribe’s Title 34 slated for the April 28 primary election ballot has conversations at council, community and kitchen tables on the rise. Read More →

Feds Give Tribes Green Light to Grow and Sell Marijuana on Tribal Lands

The U.S. Justice Department announced last week that they will not enforce federal marijuana laws on federally recognized tribes that choose to allow it as long as they meet eight federal guidelines, including that marijuana not be sold to minors and not be transported to areas that prohibit it. Local tribes, such as the Hoopa and Yurok Tribes, have strict laws preventing marijuana cultivation and the Justice Department’s recent announcement will not change individual tribal laws. Only the tribes themselves can do that. In Hoopa, a petition was filed on Monday morning to repeal the Tribe’s marijuana prohibition law. If the petition receives the requisite number of signatures it will be placed on a special election ballot to be voted on by Hoopa Valley Tribal Members./Photo courtesy of Arizona Medical Marijuana Community.A U.S. Department of Justice memorandum released last week opens the window for federally recognized tribes to grow and sell marijuana on tribal lands, raising a long debated issue among local tribes that work to suppress large-scale grows because of environmental damage and criminal activity. The memorandum prompted Hoopa Valley tribal member and former tribal chairman Clifford Lyle Marshall, Sr., to file a petition to repeal the Hoopa tribe’s law that prohibits marijuana cultivation on the reservation. Read More →

Surveillance and Sewage

The Willow Creek Community Services District Board of Directors met for their regular meeting last Thursday. They discussed the process to gain permission to install surveillance cameras throughout downtown Willow Creek. The next WCCSD meeting will be held on December 18 at 8 am./Photo by Bill Vassilakis, TRT contributing writer.The board then turned its attention to the meat of the meeting: Unfinished Business, in the shape of 1) a plan recently taking shape to install a system of surveillance cameras downtown, and 2) an engineering report on a wastewater system that’s been in the works for years. Though the hired consulting engineers were eager to tell their septic system story and be on their way, the meeting’s attention would first linger on the camera plan, which had finally found a forthright critic. Read More →

Trespass Marijuana Plantations Wreak Havoc in Trinity Alps Wilderness

Army, National Guard and other law enforcement officers prepare to load the helicopter with irrigation line, garbage and a few remnant marijuana plants./Photos by Allie Hostler, Two Rivers TribuneThe sites encompass habitat of the federally endangered coho salmon, federally threatened northern spotted owl and the Pacific fisher, which was recently proposed for listing as federally threatened. Scientific data conclusively proves how pollution from illegal marijuana cultivation has further degraded habitat quality for each species and how bioaccumulating rodenticides, common to illegal cultivation sites, continue to negatively affect the northern spotted owl and Pacific fisher. Read More →