Environment

Supply Creek Restoration Project

New Supply Creek Diversions have been made and this work will increase the amount of high quality in-stream habitat available for salmon throughout various stream flow conditions./Photo by Keterah Lipscomb, Two Rivers Tribune.The 2015 restoration work was needed because the 1964 flood destroyed salmon, steelhead and Pacific lamprey habitat. Deep pools and winter habitat were impaired. Emergency repairs by the Army Corps of Engineers created levees and channels which constrain salmon, steelhead trout and Pacific lamprey habitat. Read More →

River Activists and Tribes Prepare For Water Board Public Hearings in Orleans, Arcata and Yreka

Former Hoopa Valley Tribal Council Member, Hayley Hutt shown outside of the California Water Resources Control Board Meeting in Sacramento on  July 17, 2012, where the Hoopa Tribe has continually asked the Water Board to stop stalling the 401 Clean Water Certification process for PacifiCorp. The Hoopa Valley Tribe has argued that stalling the 401 certification process only buys PacifCorp more without being accoutnable for the poor water quality conditions their dams cause on the Klamath River./TRT file photo. The schedule includes a meeting Thursday, January 14, in Sacramento, then meetings in Arcata on Monday, January 25, and in Orleans and Yreka, both on Tuesday, January 26. The Orleans session is an add-on requested by the Karuk Tribe in their effort to encourage more input from people in the river communities. It is a step in the process open to both scientists and to locals who may want to make sure the Water Board does not overlook any issue dam opponents consider important. Read More →

Prepare For Slides

This rock slide temporarily closed State Route 96 west of Happy Camp. Several rock slides on  SR-96 and SR-299 caused road closures or controlled traffic throughout recent storms./Photo courtesy of actionnewsnow.com.In the past couple of weeks, slides have closed highways on both state routes 96 and 299, sometimes for a couple of hours, sometimes for a couple days. As of Friday, highway 96 was open to one-way traffic near Clear Creek south of Happy Camp. All state routes on 299 in the Two Rivers region were open. Read More →

VOICES: Will Tribes Hinder the FERC Process For Klamath Dam Removal?

21-1klamathopedprotestphotoFor over a decade one of the main points of contention has been dam removal on the river. In the KBRA, signatory parties wanted California rate and taxpayers to cover the cost of dam removal for Pacificorp, the owner of JC Boyle, Copco 1, Copco 2, and Iron Gate dams. The KHSA was conditioned upon enactment of federal legislation, among other factors. That legislation clearly will not occur. Read More →

Talking Pot, Cannabis, Marijuana and Flowers in Hoopa

Jack Norton (center) was recently appointed by the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council as a political advisor on marijuana issues./Photo by Allie Hostler, Two Rivers Tribune.A citizen initiative to repeal the Hoopa Valley Tribe’s Title 34 slated for the April 28 primary election ballot has conversations at council, community and kitchen tables on the rise. Read More →

Forest Management Plans Led By Community

Nearly 50 participants went to the woods to talk about how they would treat forest fuels given the set of six shared values the group had agreed to the year prior during the Western Klamath Restoration Partnership’s first meetings. The Partnership began in 2013 to build bridges between the antagonists of the so-called Timber Wars and continues to meet to prepare forest management plans./Photo by Will Harling, Mid Klamath Watershed Council. One was a law passed in 2002 called the Healthy Forest Initiative. The timber industry welcomed it, but environmental groups renamed it the No-Tree-Left-Behind Act because it seemed to target removal of the larger trees instead of the brush and smaller trees that form the ladder fuels for the most severe burns. Read More →

Orphan Cub Finds Home Plate for the Holidays

Web 4  An orphaned bear cub decided to go to school today. The cub climbed up the fence behind home plate on the High School boy’s baseball field on Highway 96. Hoopa Valley Tribal Forestry wildlife biologist Mark Higley said the cub likely wandered down from the nearby mountains in search of food and became frightened. […] Read More →

Feds Give Tribes Green Light to Grow and Sell Marijuana on Tribal Lands

The U.S. Justice Department announced last week that they will not enforce federal marijuana laws on federally recognized tribes that choose to allow it as long as they meet eight federal guidelines, including that marijuana not be sold to minors and not be transported to areas that prohibit it. Local tribes, such as the Hoopa and Yurok Tribes, have strict laws preventing marijuana cultivation and the Justice Department’s recent announcement will not change individual tribal laws. Only the tribes themselves can do that. In Hoopa, a petition was filed on Monday morning to repeal the Tribe’s marijuana prohibition law. If the petition receives the requisite number of signatures it will be placed on a special election ballot to be voted on by Hoopa Valley Tribal Members./Photo courtesy of Arizona Medical Marijuana Community.A U.S. Department of Justice memorandum released last week opens the window for federally recognized tribes to grow and sell marijuana on tribal lands, raising a long debated issue among local tribes that work to suppress large-scale grows because of environmental damage and criminal activity. The memorandum prompted Hoopa Valley tribal member and former tribal chairman Clifford Lyle Marshall, Sr., to file a petition to repeal the Hoopa tribe’s law that prohibits marijuana cultivation on the reservation. Read More →