Karuk Fishermen at Ishi Pishi Falls, Still Dipnet Salmon Traditional Style

Ron Reed, right, explains his views on the losses of Karuk ecological knowledge and the efforts to rebuild it, between passes of dipnet fishing at Ishi Pishi Falls. His companion Brian Tripp, adds his own perspective./Photo by Jayme Kalal. Brian Tripp is well known for his gifts—poet and painter, sculptor and ceremonial singer—but he has another gift besides. He seems able to talk me into things. Read More →

Fox Near Orleans Tests Positive For Rabies

The Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS) Public Health Laboratory confirmed that a fox from the Orleans area has tested positive for rabies. Testing was conducted following an incident that involved human exposure, with one person now receiving prophylactic treatment. Read More →

Karuk Tribe Holds Its Own Climate Study Session

Acorn soup was a staple and still looms large in discussions of tribal cultural survival and of food security. When EcoAdapt, a consulting firm, convened a meeting of “stakeholders” in early spring to discuss climate change vulnerability, they dropped tanoak trees from a list of key species. The Karuk Tribe called its own climate assessment meeting this month to present its issues to agencies and to remind them that agencies had a special responsibility to consult with tribes./Photo courtesy of Malcolm Terence.  EcoAdapt, a non-profit outfit, was writing a risk assessment about climate change for the federal land management agencies that control much of Northern California. They invited stakeholders to workshops in the spring. Tribes were invited, but they have long said that they are legally entitled to government-to-government consultation, a level of process that should operate differently than the stakeholder interactions with other groups such as environmental groups, irrigators, and other interested locals. Read More →

Youth Protest Pollution From Klamath Strait Drain

Youth protestors lay on the ground in front of the Klamath County Government Office, representing the image of past fish kills on the Klamath river largely due to contamination and low flows./Photo courtesy of Youth Coalition for Clean Klamath. KLAMATH FALLS, Ore.–Monday, July 18, a group of youth including members of several tribes, orchestrated three dynamic protests to demand a thorough clean-up of the polluted Klamath Strait Drain, which pumps polluted water into the Klamath River, harming down river communities and Klamath salmon. Read More →

Slack Management of Wilderness Grazing gets Scrutiny from Tribes and Environmentalists

Tonya Lindsey, an environmental assistant from the Quartz Valley Indian Reservation, takes water samples from lower Shackleford Creek as part of the Tribe’s ongoing study of the effects of cattle grazing allotments in the headwaters. A sweat lodge shell is in the background. /Photo courtesy of Quartz Valley Indian Reservation.There was a question of what might be the source, possibly recreational hikers in the wilderness, but the University of Montana conducted a statistical analysis with the first seven years of the Quartz Valley Tribe’s survey to determine where the highest concentrations might be coming from. It is available online at http://goo.gl/3ZzZpv. Read More →

Humboldt County, CAMP, Fish and Wildlife Bust Trespass Marijuana Grows

HCSOn Thursday and Friday, July 7-8 the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office Drug Enforcement Unit (DEU) along with CAMP (Campaign Against Marijuana Planting) personnel, and Fish & Wildlife Officers conducted trespass marijuana grow investigations in the Pecwan, Weitchepec and Orleans areas of Humboldt County. Read More →

Fire Crews Make Progress On Wooley Creek Blaze

Firefighters are battling a wildfire in a tributary of Wooley Creek in the Marble Mountain Wilderness near Somes Bar. Early last week Forest Service officials said the blaze was caused by two lost hikers who lit a signal fire to guide rescuers to their location, according to a TV news report, but by the end of the week spokesmen from the Six Rivers National Forest said only that the fire “was likely human caused, and is under investigation at the moment.” Read More →

Fire on the Mountain

The weather and fuel conditions on the Pony Fire compounded by difficult, even dangerous access made direct attack impossible for firefighters. The fire grew from 10 acres to 150 acres in a few minutes at this point on June 7./Photo by Aja Conrad. Local Volunteers and Rain Help Knock Down Pony Fire, Family Overwhelmed With Support By Malcolm Terence, Two Rivers Tribune Contributing Writer Published on June 28, 2016 in Volume 22, Issue 26 Jeremy Dahl was gardening in his yard between Somes Bar and Happy Camp in early June when he saw smoke boiling up from nearby Pony […] Read More →