Environment

Tribe Starts Endowment As Alternative To Grant Funding

Restoration of the fire management regimes used by the tribes in the region is one of the goals of an endowment fund recently started by the Karuk Tribe’s Department of Natural Resources. The fund has already raised $11,425 from 86 contributors, mostly local. Details are available at https://www.gofundme.com/bdjn9ezq. Silk painting by Susan Terence.The Karuk Tribe may not have flocks of rich alumni, but this month its fundraising crossed the threshold to begin its own endowment. Bill Tripp announced that the Karuk Endowment for Eco-Cultural Revitalization had raised $11,555 in four months, not billions, but enough to invest in a portfolio managed by Humboldt Area Foundation (HAF). Read More →

San Luis Settlement Agreement Would Forever Condemn The Hoopa Valley Tribe to Poverty

The Hoopa Valley Tribe filed its objection today to two bills proposed in the House of Representatives H.R. 4366 and H.R. 5217 intended to implement the San Luis Settlement Agreement. Read More →

Active Slide on Highway 96

Highway 96 between Hoopa and Willow Creek has been reduced to one-way controlled traffic since mid January due to an active rock and mud slide. The Tish Tang slide is near the Tish Tang Campground near the Hoopa Reservation boundary. Read More →

Klamath Dam Removal May Proceed Without KBRA

The owner of four Klamath River hydroelectric dams along with the Department of Interior and the states of Oregon and California signed an Agreement in Principal on February 2, a formal, but non-binding document that declares their intention to work with the parties of the Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement (KHSA) to amend the KHSA in order to facilitate the removal of four dams on the Klamath River.The initiative by the Department of Interior, the states and the dam owner may accomplish the action most important to Tribes, conservationists and fishermen, but pays limited attention to the water access issues most important to upper basin farmers and irrigators. Read More →

Residents Voice Concerns About Klamath River Dams

More than 20 Orleans area residents expressed their concerns about the dams on the Klamath River at a scoping meeting before California Water Resources Control Board officials last week. All of the speakers said they want the dams removed./Photo by Leslie Lollich, TRT Contributor.An ex Yurok and Karuk water scientist stood up to put on record that “spring Chinook have been suffering since conquest.” He also reminded the water board that the dams would only rightly be considered point source polluters, since, removal of the dams would release accumulated mercury sludge. Pointing out that the dams were a genocidal project, he set the tone for the rest of the meeting. Read More →

Slides Cause Closures and Delays on Highways 96 and 299

A rock slide on State Route 96 caused a road closure between Hoopa and Willow Creek near Tish Tang on Thursday, January 28.A rock slide on State Route 96 caused a road closure between Hoopa and Willow Creek near Tish Tang on Thursday, January 28. Read More →

Trinity County Holds Its First Medical Marijuana Forum

As rain pounded Northern California on Saturday January 16, the crowd at the North Fork Grange Hall in Junction City, swelled to standing room only with an overflow crowd outside of the door. Although Highway 299 was closed due to a rock slide, one speaker, Conner McIntee, a scientist from the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board, made it to the meeting by kayaking up the Trinity River to bypass the slide./Photo by Dave Garrison, Two Rivers Tribune Contributor.As rain pounded Northern California on Saturday January 16, the crowd at the North Fork Grange Hall in Junction City, swelled to standing room only with an overflow crowd outside of the door. Fifteen miles to the west a rock slide dammed highway 299 stopping traffic in both directions for several days. Read More →

New Law Adds Water Board As New Hurdle For Dredges

A miner crouches in the willows along a bank of the Klamath River as he searches for gold with a suction dredge. The Karuk Tribe has led a campaign for ten year to outlaw the practice and a new law from the California Legislature may accomplish their goal./Photo by Stormy Staats. The new law approved by Governor Jerry Brown at the end of 2015 is viewed as a devastating blow by suction dredge miners along the Klamath, but light at the end of a long tunnel for the Karuk Tribe, which has fought for ten years to end the practice because of its threats to water quality and fish survival. Read More →