Talking Pot, Cannabis, Marijuana and Flowers in Hoopa

Jack Norton (center) was recently appointed by the Hoopa Valley Tribal Council as a political advisor on marijuana issues./Photo by Allie Hostler, Two Rivers Tribune.A citizen initiative to repeal the Hoopa Valley Tribe’s Title 34 slated for the April 28 primary election ballot has conversations at council, community and kitchen tables on the rise. Read More →

Forest Management Plans Led By Community

Nearly 50 participants went to the woods to talk about how they would treat forest fuels given the set of six shared values the group had agreed to the year prior during the Western Klamath Restoration Partnership’s first meetings. The Partnership began in 2013 to build bridges between the antagonists of the so-called Timber Wars and continues to meet to prepare forest management plans./Photo by Will Harling, Mid Klamath Watershed Council. One was a law passed in 2002 called the Healthy Forest Initiative. The timber industry welcomed it, but environmental groups renamed it the No-Tree-Left-Behind Act because it seemed to target removal of the larger trees instead of the brush and smaller trees that form the ladder fuels for the most severe burns. Read More →

Orphan Cub Finds Home Plate for the Holidays

Web 4  An orphaned bear cub decided to go to school today. The cub climbed up the fence behind home plate on the High School boy’s baseball field on Highway 96. Hoopa Valley Tribal Forestry wildlife biologist Mark Higley said the cub likely wandered down from the nearby mountains in search of food and became frightened. […] Read More →

Feds Give Tribes Green Light to Grow and Sell Marijuana on Tribal Lands

The U.S. Justice Department announced last week that they will not enforce federal marijuana laws on federally recognized tribes that choose to allow it as long as they meet eight federal guidelines, including that marijuana not be sold to minors and not be transported to areas that prohibit it. Local tribes, such as the Hoopa and Yurok Tribes, have strict laws preventing marijuana cultivation and the Justice Department’s recent announcement will not change individual tribal laws. Only the tribes themselves can do that. In Hoopa, a petition was filed on Monday morning to repeal the Tribe’s marijuana prohibition law. If the petition receives the requisite number of signatures it will be placed on a special election ballot to be voted on by Hoopa Valley Tribal Members./Photo courtesy of Arizona Medical Marijuana Community.A U.S. Department of Justice memorandum released last week opens the window for federally recognized tribes to grow and sell marijuana on tribal lands, raising a long debated issue among local tribes that work to suppress large-scale grows because of environmental damage and criminal activity. The memorandum prompted Hoopa Valley tribal member and former tribal chairman Clifford Lyle Marshall, Sr., to file a petition to repeal the Hoopa tribe’s law that prohibits marijuana cultivation on the reservation. Read More →

Meeting of the Fire Minds

Learning to burn. The public met in SawyerDuring the summer, one of the driest on record, 220,000 acres were afire in the Klamath Forest and, at the peak, 6,800 firefighters were deployed. It all cost approximately $175 million. The Two Rivers Tribune attended the Salmon River AAR session. The area near the community of Sawyers Bar burned in the White’s Fire and there were a few days when the town itself was threatened. Read More →

Surveillance and Sewage

The Willow Creek Community Services District Board of Directors met for their regular meeting last Thursday. They discussed the process to gain permission to install surveillance cameras throughout downtown Willow Creek. The next WCCSD meeting will be held on December 18 at 8 am./Photo by Bill Vassilakis, TRT contributing writer.The board then turned its attention to the meat of the meeting: Unfinished Business, in the shape of 1) a plan recently taking shape to install a system of surveillance cameras downtown, and 2) an engineering report on a wastewater system that’s been in the works for years. Though the hired consulting engineers were eager to tell their septic system story and be on their way, the meeting’s attention would first linger on the camera plan, which had finally found a forthright critic. Read More →

Nip it in the Bud

Peach leaf curl is a fungus that can severely damage the productivity of a tree or even kill it./Photo courtesy of the University of Missouri Agricultural Extension. Most gardeners in the Klamath-Trinity have encountered Peach Leaf Curl – the curled, deformed leaves that appear on peaches and nectarines in the early spring. Problem is, by the time it’s visible it is already too late to treat it; in fact, the ideal window for controlling peach leaf curl is coming up in early to mid-December. Read More →

Learning to Burn Again

Scott Harding ignites ground fuels with a drip torch at Pearch Creek in Orleans. Agencies, tribes and non-profits sponsored the exercise to build fuels reduction skills in the region. Earlier, Harding was part of a crew that burned the part of his own property that had not burned in last summer’s Butler Fire. Photo by Stormy Staats, Klamath-Salmon Media Collaborative. The burn plans were signed and all the permits finally granted. The crews, packing tools and wearing fire gear, gathered along Gold Dredge Road in Orleans. Firelines were in place. Then they waited, ironically, for the morning dew to dry. Read More →