Arts & Culture

Bigfoot Tales

Cover art provided by Bigfoot One. Visit their website at www.bigfootone.com Welcome to the Bigfoot Capital of the World. Klamath-Trinity communities love their furry friend of the forest so much that dozens of local businesses and products boast his name and likeness from the Bigfoot Burger at the Early Bird in Willow Creek to the larger-than-life metal sculpture in Happy Camp. Our community’s deep reverence for Bigfoot is steeped in a rich history of stories—personal accounts, legends, beliefs, investigation and mystery. Upon learning about the Bigfoot Festival planned by the Discovery Channel’s Animal Planet, we cracked open our poorly organized vault of previously published Bigfoot stories and hand-picked a few of our favorites to share with you. The special edition is for sale now on eastern Humboldt newsstands. We couldn't fit all of what we wanted into the newspaper, so we're posting the overflow here. Read More →

Bold and Boundless

Leona Colegrove was featured on the Bold and Boundless website, an online magazine that celebrates the strength of women through mind, body and soul./Photo by Venessa Jose, Bold and Boundless founder and director. She walked into the studio and I immediately felt her positive energy. I reached out to Leona Colegrove weeks ago because she was nominated by a friend of mine, who told me a little about Leona’s incredible journey. I knew I had to meet her. A funny thing happened, a few days before the photo shoot, I realized I actually knew Leona from many years ago. Read More →

Karuk Storytellers Bypass Bookshelf

Ben Saxon, back to camera, polls students for their reactions after a lesson in oral tradition and storytelling at Junction School in Orleans./Photo by Malcolm Terence, Two Rivers Tribune Contributor.For generations children were taken from Native families in the U.S. and sent to Indian boarding schools where they were instructed in the English language white culture at the expense of their own language and culture. The Karuk Tribe is using a handful of federal grants to move in the other direction with the present generation of young people. The new program was put into action when a group of story tellers came to river schools. Besides the stories, the group shared xuun sára, acorn bread or crackers, and champínishich, yerba buena tea. Jesse Goodwin, one of the students, nodded appreciatively at the snacks and said he’d never had either before. His classmates agreed. Read More →

Hundreds Attend Memorial for Basket Weaver and Organizer in Orleans

Nearly 50 marchers left Orleans School headed for the bridge across the Klamath River. By the time they got there, their numbers had nearly doubled. Add that to the definition of River Time./Photo by Konrad Fisher, Klamath Riverkeeper. People gathered in large numbers in Orleans over the last week at three events. Each of them—a story-telling dinner with Standing Rock veterans, the memorial for a well-known Karuk organizer and a local version of the women’s marches held around the world—signaled the community rallying in the face of an uncertain political future. The Standing Rock event drew 120 people, a third of them had traveled to encampments started by Sioux natives in North Dakota to resist the completion of an oil pipeline that threatens their water supply. Read More →

Divorce Sucks Until It Doesn’t

James is a writer, artist, teacher, optimist, father, a survivor and much more. He has a vision to give people hope-the kind of hope that starts people thinking ahead with some optimism. James hopes to spread and share his positivity with the world and is responsible for the now viral #counterpunchhatewithlove movement./Photo courtesy of James Calderon.What an interesting week eh? With the presidential election being over, it seems like the collective consciousness has finally reared its ugly head. On one side we have people gloating over the win of their desired candidate, and on the other side we have people grieving over the loss their party has experienced. It’s sad to see people at each other’s throats both on and offline. Of all my years on this planet, this is the most divided I have seen our nation. So why do I still have hope? Well, this whole division thing we are experiencing reminds me of divorce. There is no way around it, divorce sucks until it doesn’t anymore. Read More →

Somes Bar 8th Grader Reports on Standing Rock

A crowd of water protectors form a prayer circle as part of an action at Standing Rock. Their campaign to stop the construction of a pipeline that could threaten Sioux tribal water supplies has drawn thousands of supporters to North Dakota and members from at least 300 tribes. Their tactics, all non-violent, have been met with increasing violence by heavily militarized police./Photo by Aja Conrad. Editor’s note: Emma Boykin is 13 years old, an eighth-grader at Junction School in Somes Bar and a member of the Karuk Tribe. I heard about the protests to stop pipeline construction at Standing Rock for a while, and I was very interested in the actions by Natives and other people from all over the country. My brother Brent Boykin and two cousins had been there and returned full of stories. We got to the Oceti Sakowin camp in the middle of the night. In the morning I went up to the main camp where we joined a water ceremony. We went to the Klamath Basin Camp because we brought a lot of food to donate. The cook told us we were welcome. We moved our tent over to the Klamath Basin camp and began helping in the kitchen. We knew a few people, but everyone was very welcoming so you got to know everyone quickly. We helped organize the food and helped prep food for upcoming meals. No one argued the whole time we were there. Read More →

Karuk Fishermen at Ishi Pishi Falls, Still Dipnet Salmon Traditional Style

Ron Reed, right, explains his views on the losses of Karuk ecological knowledge and the efforts to rebuild it, between passes of dipnet fishing at Ishi Pishi Falls. His companion Brian Tripp, adds his own perspective./Photo by Jayme Kalal. Brian Tripp is well known for his gifts—poet and painter, sculptor and ceremonial singer—but he has another gift besides. He seems able to talk me into things. Read More →

Cooking Healthy In Indian Country: Wild Raspberry Jam

22-28 CHIC BerriesMy family loves berries. We love jams, pies, cobblers, just plain popping them in our mouth and enjoying them. First, let me talk about the journey. One of my favorite things to do with the family is to go on our gathering trips. We pack up a picnic basket, grab our favorite treats and load like sardines into the vehicle. All the way up the hill, loud laughter and shrieks can be heard coming from the front and back seat when the kids sing along to their favorite song, or make up their own. Read More →