Arts & Culture

An Eye on the Future

Laverne Glaze, the elder basket weaver and Karuk activist, shows off a regalia skirt still a work in progress. She reflected, “My life is getting pretty damn short I still need to teach some of these young girls how to sew dresses.”/Photo by Malcolm TerenceGlaze, who spent decades as a promoter and organizer of basketweaving, is now 82 years old and hobbled by arthritis and even occasional difficulty breathing, but she is still working hard with an eye on the future. Read More →

First Baptist Church of Hoopa Ordains New Pastor at Well-Attended Ceremony

Newly-ordained Pastor Ethan “Red Eagle” Lawton, center left, talked with Hoopa Elder Maggie Dickson, center right, after the ceremony on Saturday, November 29, 2014 at the First Baptist Church of Hoopa. / Photo by Kristan Korns Lawton said his good friend Caprice Agglof, who helps organize the yearly Vacation Bible School (VBS) in Hoopa, first drew him to Hoopa. “I hadn’t heard of Hoopa until about two years ago,” Lawton said. “I’ll be here for as long as God leads; two years, 10 years…” Read More →

Stories, Legends and Other Things: George Gibbs 1815-1873

George Gibbs./Photo courtesy of Wiki CommonsAccurate accounts of the very early days of contact between Native people and miners are scarce, at best. Since newspapers and military sources offering some accountability would not arrive in the area until 1853, most accounts prior to that time were derived from the non-Indian participants, which were subject to distortion and inaccuracy. Oral history accounts from the Natives are for the most part discounted by historians who wrote Humboldt County history due in part to the exaggerated information gathered from the white participants years later. Read More →

Learning to Burn Again

Scott Harding ignites ground fuels with a drip torch at Pearch Creek in Orleans. Agencies, tribes and non-profits sponsored the exercise to build fuels reduction skills in the region. Earlier, Harding was part of a crew that burned the part of his own property that had not burned in last summer’s Butler Fire. Photo by Stormy Staats, Klamath-Salmon Media Collaborative. The burn plans were signed and all the permits finally granted. The crews, packing tools and wearing fire gear, gathered along Gold Dredge Road in Orleans. Firelines were in place. Then they waited, ironically, for the morning dew to dry. Read More →

Merkie Oliver Shares the Old Days, Old Ways, With Visiting Friends

Merkie Oliver jumps center in an old photo from the mid-1950s. The picture was from an old film clip and repurposed for a tee shirt by his friends Thomas Dunklin, the Arcata photographer, and Brian Tripp, the Orleans-based artist and Karuk ceremony singer. When his two friends entered the room, Merkie Oliver, the storied Yurok fisherman, straightened his back and broke into a huge smile. It was not the easiest thing to straighten in the hospital style bed where he, by his own estimate, had been confined too long. Read More →

Somes Bar Builder Tries Old Methods To Build Houses of the Future

Dillon Creasy built frame of massive timbers, all cut from local trees, after the foundation and floor slab were poured. The next step would be the construction of thick walls packed with straw infused with a wet clay slurry./Photo courtesy of Dillon Creasy.  Creasy says that homes built with the same methods in Europe 800 years ago are still in use. The straw content of the walls would make them seem vulnerable to rot and fire but the infusion of the clay slurry just before the packing stage adds durability. Read More →

History Deeper Than a Thousand Walnut Roots

Nicole Ammon tells the stories that make up her family history, mostly surrounding the ranch house she recently restored./Photo by Allie Hostler, Two Rivers TribuneHe also frequented the Indian School in Hupa and was well-liked according to historical accounts found in the Susie Baker Fountain Papers at Humboldt State University. Nicolé said it became too difficult for Fountain to transport goods and supplies over the old single-file mule bridge so he decided to build a bridge that could support motorized vehicles. Read More →

Stories, Legends and Other Things

As descendants of the people who lived in this valley not too long ago, we sometimes wonder how we as people in this modern age can readapt some of those ancient ways to help make our lives better. Of course there are certain ways that could never be brought back. We have too many outside influences which we could never change. Modern technology has made us too dependent on certain things and it would be impossible for us to function without them. But perhaps the real concern for us today is the things that we may be losing. Read More →