Community

Forest Management Plans Led By Community

Nearly 50 participants went to the woods to talk about how they would treat forest fuels given the set of six shared values the group had agreed to the year prior during the Western Klamath Restoration Partnership’s first meetings. The Partnership began in 2013 to build bridges between the antagonists of the so-called Timber Wars and continues to meet to prepare forest management plans./Photo by Will Harling, Mid Klamath Watershed Council. One was a law passed in 2002 called the Healthy Forest Initiative. The timber industry welcomed it, but environmental groups renamed it the No-Tree-Left-Behind Act because it seemed to target removal of the larger trees instead of the brush and smaller trees that form the ladder fuels for the most severe burns. Read More →

Orphan Cub Finds Home Plate for the Holidays

Web 4  An orphaned bear cub decided to go to school today. The cub climbed up the fence behind home plate on the High School boy’s baseball field on Highway 96. Hoopa Valley Tribal Forestry wildlife biologist Mark Higley said the cub likely wandered down from the nearby mountains in search of food and became frightened. […] Read More →

Shedding Light on Problems Along Highway 96

Rod Mendes, director of the Hoopa Valley Tribe’s Office of Emergency Services said that over the next few weeks 14 streetlights will be repaired to improve safety in and around Downtown Hoopa. A concurrent project will improve lighting near local business to deter crime./Photo by Allie Hostler, Two Rivers Tribune A grand total of 14 lights will be installed along the highway and scattered throughout downtown business areas, lighting up parking lots and buildings. Hoopa residents will soon see more lighting in front of Ray’s Food Place, Lucky Bear Casino (LBC), and the Hoopa Tribal Museum. There will also be 12 speed bumps placed strategically throughout this parking lot. Read More →

Hoopa Resident Laura Jordan Graduates UC Davis Medical School

Laura Jordan graduated on May 29, 2014, from U.C.-Medical School. Dr. Laura Jordan has shown through perserverence that childhood dreams can come true./Photo courtesy of Laura JordanIt all started when Laura’s parents, Larry and Angela Jordan, bought their young daughter a toy medical kit. She loved it and always said she wanted to be a doctor. As her dreams began to take shape, Laura was awed when she heard there was a female Native American doctor working at K’ima:w Medical Center (KMC) in Hoopa. Read More →

An Eye on the Future

Laverne Glaze, the elder basket weaver and Karuk activist, shows off a regalia skirt still a work in progress. She reflected, “My life is getting pretty damn short I still need to teach some of these young girls how to sew dresses.”/Photo by Malcolm TerenceGlaze, who spent decades as a promoter and organizer of basketweaving, is now 82 years old and hobbled by arthritis and even occasional difficulty breathing, but she is still working hard with an eye on the future. Read More →

Local Fighter Undefeated

Orion Cosce at recent fight at Blue Lake Casino. Cosce said he stays true to himself and hasn’t changed. Coach for the Lost Boys,  Uriah Naimone instructs his fighters that “People don’t plan the fail-They fail to plan.”/Photo Courtesy of Ernesto Balderramos“I will be on TV someday, without a doubt, whether it be on USF or Global Fighting,” said Cosce. “I enjoy MMA fighting because it is a one-on-one sport. You cannot blame others’ mistakes for you losing.” Read More →

First Baptist Church of Hoopa Ordains New Pastor at Well-Attended Ceremony

Newly-ordained Pastor Ethan “Red Eagle” Lawton, center left, talked with Hoopa Elder Maggie Dickson, center right, after the ceremony on Saturday, November 29, 2014 at the First Baptist Church of Hoopa. / Photo by Kristan Korns Lawton said his good friend Caprice Agglof, who helps organize the yearly Vacation Bible School (VBS) in Hoopa, first drew him to Hoopa. “I hadn’t heard of Hoopa until about two years ago,” Lawton said. “I’ll be here for as long as God leads; two years, 10 years…” Read More →

Deadly Roads

Although hardly scientific, on Monday, November 24, the Two Rivers Tribune observed pedestrian traffic at 2 pm in downtown Hoopa. Within five minutes 10 pedestrians were counted within a 200-foot radius of the Hoopa Mini-Mart, half of whom crossed the highway without using either of the two crosswalks. One pedestrian was observed using the crosswalk. Hoopa, Karuk and Yurok lands amount to less than 25 percent of Humboldt County’s total land mass, but these areas were the site of 33 percent of all traffic related fatalities in 2009, and over 50 percent of the county’s fatalities in 2008. Read More →