Hoopa Valley Tribe Testifies Against Westlands in Federal Court

On Monday, the Hoopa Valley Tribe testified in front of a panel of three federal judges asking them to overturn a previous ruling in favor of San Luis and Delta-Mendota Water Authority and Westlands Water District. From left to right: Hoopa Valley Tribal Fisheries Director Mike Orcutt, Self-Governance Director Daniel Jordan, Chairman Ryan Jackson and Attorney Tom Schlosser.

On Monday, the Hoopa Valley Tribe testified in front of a panel of three federal judges asking them to overturn a previous ruling in favor of San Luis and Delta-Mendota Water Authority and Westlands Water District. From left to right: Hoopa Valley Tribal Fisheries Director Mike Orcutt, Self-Governance Director Daniel Jordan, Chairman Ryan Jackson and Attorney Tom Schlosser./Photo by Vivienna Orcutt, Hoopa Valley Tribal Council.

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Hoopa Valley Tribe Applauds Appeals Court’s Decision To Uphold Life-Saving Water Releases For Hoopa Fish

20140711_Final_KBCV_map_2nd_edToday, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld water releases to the Trinity River to prevent salmon die-off downstream. Since the horrific 2002 salmon kill on the Lower Klamath River, the Bureau of Reclamation has released supplemental water from the Trinity River Reservoir on numerous occasions to prevent similar fish kills.

Hoopa Valley Tribe Wins Court Case to Protect Salmon

Hoopa Water Team-Mike Orcutt, Danny Jordan, Chairman Ryan Jackson, Tom Schlosser.On Wednesday, February 8, A United States District Court judge ruled that federal agencies must take preventative and emergency measures to reduce the incidence of disease among juvenile salmon, the major source of mortality limiting runs of returning adults to the Klamath River and its tributaries. This decision was welcomed by the Hoopa Valley Tribe, who initiated the lawsuit challenging the federal government’s inaction given two years of high disease rates and poor adult returns.

Hundreds Attend Memorial for Basket Weaver and Organizer in Orleans

Nearly 50 marchers left Orleans School headed for the bridge across the Klamath River. By the time they got there, their numbers had nearly doubled. Add that to the definition of River Time./Photo by Konrad Fisher, Klamath Riverkeeper. People gathered in large numbers in Orleans over the last week at three events. Each of them—a story-telling dinner with Standing Rock veterans, the memorial for a well-known Karuk organizer and a local version of the women’s marches held around the world—signaled the community rallying in the face of an uncertain political future. The Standing Rock event drew 120 people, a third of them had traveled to encampments started by Sioux natives in North Dakota to resist the completion of an oil pipeline that threatens their water supply.

Hoopa Valley Tribe Testifies Against Westlands in Federal Court

From left to right: Hoopa Valley Tribal Fisheries Director Mike Orcutt, Self-Governance Director Daniel Jordan, Chairman Ryan Jackson and Attorney Tom Schlosser.On Monday, the Hoopa Valley Tribe, the Yurok Tribe and an attorney representing the United States testified in front of a panel of three federal judges asking them to overturn a previous ruling in favor of San Luis and Delta Mendota Water Authority and Westlands Water District. Westlands claimed that the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation did not have the authority to release additional water from the Trinity River to prevent a fish kill on the Lower Klamath River. Reclamation, at the urging of tribal and fisheries scientists, has ordered extra releases of Trinity River water for three consecutive years when river conditions reach certain thresholds and fish disease is detected.

Obama Blocks Dakota Pipeline

Carley Whitecrane, flanked by her children, joined the march she helped organize in Orleans last week. Despite short notice, 75 people showed to show opposition to completion of the Dakota Access Pipeline. In mid-November Carley and her family traveled to Salem, Oregon, to oppose permits that would allow another fossil fuel pipeline that would cross the Klamath River./Photo by Konrad Fisher, Klamath Riverkeeper. Federal officials from the Army Corps of Engineers announced Sunday that that they would not approve the permit to construct the last leg of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) in its present route across the Missouri River. The decision was met by cheers across the camps at Standing Rock. A , few days before the Army Corps announcement an estimated 75 people joined for a march and rally in Orleans last week to support the water protectors, and they gathered with only one-day notice. To give perspective, the population of Orleans is 500-600. A proportionally large turnout in New York City would be around 1.2 million.

Divorce Sucks Until It Doesn’t

James is a writer, artist, teacher, optimist, father, a survivor and much more. He has a vision to give people hope-the kind of hope that starts people thinking ahead with some optimism. James hopes to spread and share his positivity with the world and is responsible for the now viral #counterpunchhatewithlove movement./Photo courtesy of James Calderon.What an interesting week eh? With the presidential election being over, it seems like the collective consciousness has finally reared its ugly head. On one side we have people gloating over the win of their desired candidate, and on the other side we have people grieving over the loss their party has experienced. It’s sad to see people at each other’s throats both on and offline. Of all my years on this planet, this is the most divided I have seen our nation. So why do I still have hope? Well, this whole division thing we are experiencing reminds me of divorce. There is no way around it, divorce sucks until it doesn’t anymore.

Humboldt Jiu Jitsu and Hoopa Project Connect Join Forces to Teach Women’s Self-Defense

According to the U.S. Department of Justice a woman or girl is sexually assaulted somewhere in America every 90 seconds. Add that one out of every five American women has been the victim of rape or attempted rape in their lifetime. The numbers worsen for teenaged girls. Girls aged 16-19 are four times more likely to be victims of rape, attempted rape or sexual assault./Photo by Teresa Mitchell, Two Rivers Tribune.As if the odds weren’t already stacked against them, American Indian teens are even three times more likely than non-American Indian girls to be sexually assaulted. Lisa Sanderson, an advocate and educator with Hoopa’s Project Connect, also recognized the need and coordinated a self-defense seminar at Hoopa Valley High School two weeks ago.

Somes Bar 8th Grader Reports on Standing Rock

A crowd of water protectors form a prayer circle as part of an action at Standing Rock. Their campaign to stop the construction of a pipeline that could threaten Sioux tribal water supplies has drawn thousands of supporters to North Dakota and members from at least 300 tribes. Their tactics, all non-violent, have been met with increasing violence by heavily militarized police./Photo by Aja Conrad. Editor’s note: Emma Boykin is 13 years old, an eighth-grader at Junction School in Somes Bar and a member of the Karuk Tribe. I heard about the protests to stop pipeline construction at Standing Rock for a while, and I was very interested in the actions by Natives and other people from all over the country. My brother Brent Boykin and two cousins had been there and returned full of stories. We got to the Oceti Sakowin camp in the middle of the night. In the morning I went up to the main camp where we joined a water ceremony. We went to the Klamath Basin Camp because we brought a lot of food to donate. The cook told us we were welcome. We moved our tent over to the Klamath Basin camp and began helping in the kitchen. We knew a few people, but everyone was very welcoming so you got to know everyone quickly. We helped organize the food and helped prep food for upcoming meals. No one argued the whole time we were there.